Human Touch and our internal connection to wellbeing

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Here on week 26 we are sharing another miraculous aspect of our human qualities, and that is TOUCH. Why write about touch? Well, it is very simple. We touch ourselves all the time even unconsciously at night when we sleep, brushing our hair, and in so many ways we are in contact with ourselves through touch. With that said, doing the same action with awareness will add up a lot more benefit to it. Being a mother, wife, pet owner, and a human being, I am always using touch to communicate feelings. In Chile where I was born, we are very touchy, we hug and kiss when we meet and express our emotions through touch a lot, which when I moved here caused me a lot of rethinking before I touch someone. It is a different custom that is all. Touch does so much for living beings from a comforting, reassuring, warning, and encouraging behaviors. Touch creates secretion of hormones and so much more. When I became a makeup artist I realized that through touch I could do so much, so I took courses in Cranial Sacral, Polarity, and medical Qi Gong. There I realized the depth of just how a small amount of touch produces considerable changes, not only physically but in the emotional and etheric systems. I used it to support the actors and many times the members of the working team. I fell in love with the idea of offering an extensive service that covers more than one gift alone and I continue to learn the gifts of touch. Here is important research from authorities that are loving, caring people that share their views and knowledge on touch. Enjoy and use your heart’s intention when you touch and you to will make a huge difference.

Thank you once again. We have deep gratitude for all your support and visits from all of us at I-RAMA.

Dacher Keltner, the UC Berkeley psychology professor and faculty director of the Greater Good Science Center, shares his insights from the new science of touch: compassionate communication, touch therapies, and proof that “to touch is to give life.”

 

 

 

According to http://www.isciencetimes.com/articles/6073/20130917/sensitive-human-touch-new-research-suggests-fingers.htm

 

Highly qualified Researchers from the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden tested for years the depth of human tactile perception to get a feeling for how advanced human touch really is. In their Research, they found that human fingers can identify textures whose ridges are mere nanometers in size (also “nanometre”) is a unit used in measurements to measure length. One nanometer is one-billionth of a meter, so nanometers are certainly not used to measure long distances, it does not work for that. Instead, they serve to measure extremely small objects, such as atomic structures or transistors found in modern CPUs. It’s the first time this kind of data has been quantified, and the results are extraordinary.

“This means that, if your finger was the size of the Earth, you could feel the difference between houses from cars,” Mark Rutland, Professor of Surface Chemistry at the Royal Institute of Technology and one of the authors of the new study on human touch. “That is one of the most enjoyable aspects of this research. We discovered that a human being can feel a bump corresponding to the size of a very large molecule.” that is how amazing the human body really is.

If we consider that our skin is the largest organ we have, and for most people can be very sensitive and responsive through it, touch is of great importance to humans and many species of animals.

The warm feeling of a handheld it has so many emotional and physical ramification in our lives, the sensation of a soft cheek against ours, arms around shoulders in an embrace for a hello, a goodbye, or a conforming hug it can all go a long way toward expressing so many different feelings. But touch can actually give more than a momentary tingle touch can comfort and heal.

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The somatosensory system, also known as somatic senses, touch or tactile perception, is a complex sensory system. It is considered one of the five traditional senses. It is made up of a number of different receptors, including thermoreceptors, photoreceptors, mechanoreceptors, and chemoreceptors. It also comprises essential processing centers, or sensory modalities, such as proprioception, mechanoreception (touching), thermoception (perception of temperature), and nociception (sensation of pain). The sensory receptors cover the skin and epithelial tissues, skeletal muscles, bones and joints, internal organs, and the cardiovascular system.

Somatic senses are sometimes referred to as somesthetic senses, with the understanding that somesthesis includes touch, proprioception and (depending on usage) also the type haptic perception.

Processing primarily occurs in the primary somatosensory area in the parietal lobe of the cerebral cortex: information is sent from the receptors via sensory nerves, through tracts in the spinal cord and finally into the brain.

The system works when activity in a sensory neuron is triggered by a specific stimulus such as pain, for instance. This signal then passes to the part of the brain attributed to that area on the body—this allows the stimulus to be felt at the correct location. The mapping of the body surfaces in the brain is called a homunculus and plays a fundamental role in the creation of body image. This brain-surface (“cortical”) map is not immutable, however. Dramatic shifts can occur in response to stroke or injury.

 

 

General somatosensory pathway

 

A somatosensory pathway will typically have three long neurons: primary, secondary and tertiary (or first, second, and third).

  • The first neuron always has its cell body in the dorsal root ganglion of the spinal nerve (if a sensation is in parts of the head or neck not covered by the cervical nerves, it will be the trigeminal nerve ganglia or the ganglia of other sensory cranial nerves).
  • The second neuron has its cell body either in the spinal cord or in the brainstem. This neuron’s ascending axons will cross (decussate) to the opposite side either in the spinal cord or in the brainstem. The axons of many of these neurons terminate in the thalamus (for example the ventral posterior nucleus, VPN), others terminate in the reticular system or the cerebellum.
  • In the case of touch and certain types of pain, the third neuron has its cell body in the VPN of the thalamus and ends in the postcentral gyrus of the parietal lobe.

 

 

Periphery

 

In the periphery, the somatosensory system detects various stimuli by sensory receptors, e.g. by mechanoreceptors for tactile sensation and nociceptors for pain sensation. The sensory information (touch, pain, temperature etc.,) is then conveyed to the central nervous system by afferent neurons. There are a number of different types of afferent neurons that vary in their size, structure, and properties. Generally, there is a correlation between the type of sensory modality detected and the type of afferent neuron involved. For example, slow, thin, unmyelinated neurons conduct pain whereas faster, thicker, myelinated neurons conduct casual touch.

The receptive field of a particular afferent neuron is given by the sensory receptors supplying it and in turn from a particular region of the skin.

 

 

Spinal cord

 

In the spinal cord, the somatosensory system includes ascending pathways from the body to the brain. One major target is the postcentral gyrus in the cerebral cortex. This is the target for neurons of the dorsal column-medial lemniscus pathway and the ventral spinothalamic pathway. Note that many ascending somatosensory pathways include synapses in either the thalamus or the reticular formation before they reach the cortex. Other ascending pathways, particularly those involved with control of posture are projected to the cerebellum. These include the ventral and dorsal spinocerebellar tracts. Another important target for afferent somatosensory neurons which enter the spinal cord are those neurons involved with local segmental reflexes.

 

 

Brain

Somatosensory cortex in the cerebral lobes

The primary somatosensory area in the human cortex (also called primary somatic sensory cortex or SI) is located in the postcentral gyrus of the parietal lobe and makes up four distinct fields or regions known as Brodmann areas  The postcentral gyrus is the location of the primary somatosensory area, the main sensory receptive area for the sense of touch. Any individual neuron has its receptive field on the skin.

A relationship between the somatosensory cortical areas and their projection of the body was discovered by recording electrical activity in the human cortex after mechanosensory stimulation of different body parts during neurosurgical procedures. These data led to the construction of somatotopic maps in which a somatotopic arrangement was generated. Like other sensory areas, there is a map of sensory space called a homunculus at this location. For the primary somatosensory cortex, this is called the sensory homunculus. Areas of this part of the human brain map to certain areas of the body, dependent on the amount or importance of somatosensory input from that area. For example, there is a large area of cortex devoted to sensation in the hands, whereas the human back has a much smaller area. The somatosensory information involved with proprioception and posture also targets an entirely different part of the brain, the cerebellum.

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The effect of touch depends, of course, upon the situation. A touch from someone can be relaxing or reassuring, off-putting or gentle, soothing or stimulating. Touch can also bond us together in ways that transcend words or in situations in which words may not help. Take babies, for instance. In one study it was found that fathers who gave their infants daily bedtime massages displayed more enjoyment and warmth with their child. In another, babies given a blood test were either swaddled in blankets or held, skin-to-skin, by their mothers. The babies being hugged had lower heart rates and cried 82% less than those left wrapped and lying in their cribs.

Touch’s comfort can extend to older kids, too. After receiving massage sessions, adolescents with ADHD expressed feelings of happiness, and their teachers noted a decrease in the adolescents’ fidgeting and off-task activities. Even self-massage has benefits, as proven by a study of people trying to deal with the cravings and anxiety associated with quitting smoking. When they felt the urge to smoke, test subjects were advised to rub their hands together or stroke their earlobes. Rubbed away with the tension was the urge to light up.

Some might argue that touch and massage just distract us from our aches or anxieties. But what to make of research that links massage therapy to decreased blood pressure in adults with hypertension or to the improved immune function in women with breast cancer? Some research suggests that people who are deprived of touch early in life may have a tendency toward violent or aggressive behavior later, and research in rats has found that rats with a strong mothering instinct (measured by licking and grooming their babies) were more likely have babies that showed a strong mothering instinct.

So, is touch simply a pleasant, soothing diversion? Is it mind over matter, or something more? No matter what the case, embrace the power of touch and invite it into your life:

• Go in for the rubdown. Even if you don’t have aches and pains, book a visit to a licensed massage therapist. You’ll leave more relaxed.

• DIY massage. If you’re shy about stretching out for a massage therapist, try self-massage techniques, like rubbing your hands together to warm them and then cupping them over your closed eyes. Feel the calm wash over you as your eyes and facial muscles relax.

• Conduct some hug research. When you greet a friend or family member, go in for an embrace rather than a handshake or nod. Sample a few different varieties of a hug – arms around the waist, hands on the shoulder blades. Linger in the hug a little and really relish the sensation of closeness.

• Touch is an all-ages activity. Babies can benefit from gentle touch and massage, but the need and desire for human contact don’t dwindle as we age. Remember older relatives and friends, especially those who live on their own or who have lost their husbands or wives.

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From https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/wired-success/201503/8-reasons-why-we-need-human-touch-more-ever

Physical contact distinguishes humans from other animals. From a warm handshake or sympathetic hug to a congratulatory pat on the back, we have developed complex languages, cultures, and emotional expression through physical contact. But in a tech-saturated world, non-sexual human touch is in danger of becoming rare, if not obsolete. Despite the benefits of digital advancement, it is vital to preserve human touch in order for us truly to thrive.

Humans become nearly unrecognizable in the absence of touch. Two hundred years ago, French scientists spotted a creature resembling a human running through the forests. Once captured, they determined he was 11 years old and had run wild in the forests for much of his childhood. Originally the child, “Victor,” was determined to be an idiot; French physicians and psychiatrists eventually concluded he had been deprived of human physical touch, which had retarded his social and developmental capacities.

 

Scientific research now correlates physical touch with the following important areas:

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1 Decreased violence. Less touch as a child leads to greater violence. American developmental psychologist James W. Prescott proposed that the origins of violence in society were related to the lack of mother-child bonding. Child developmental research illustrates that the absence of physical bonding and healthy attachment between an adult and child may result in lifelong emotional disturbances.

2 Greater trust between individuals. Touch helps to bond people together. Daniel Keltner, the founding director of the Greater Good Science Center and professor of psychology at University of California, Berkeley, cites the work of neuroscientist Edmund Ross, who found that physical touch activates the brain’s orbitofrontal cortex, linked to feelings of reward and compassion. According to Keltner, “studies show that a simple touch can trigger a release of oxytocin, aka ‘the love hormone.'” Our skin contains receptors that directly elicit emotional responses, through stimulation of erogenous zones or nerve endings that respond to pain, according to researchers Auvray, Myin, and Spence.

3 Economic Gain. Keltner links economic benefits to physical touch, probably because “touch signals safety and trust; it soothes. Basic warm touch calms cardiovascular stress. It activates the body’s vagus nerve, which is intimately involved with our compassionate response.” NBA teams whose players touch each other more, for example, win more games.

4 Decreased disease and stronger immune system. Physical touch may also decrease disease. According to research conducted at the University of North Carolina, women who receive more hugs from their partners have lower heart rates and blood pressure: “Hugs strengthen the immune system…The gentle pressure on the sternum and the emotional charge this creates activates the Solar Plexus Chakra. This stimulates the thymus gland, which regulates and balances the body’s production of white blood cells, which keeps you healthy and disease-free.” Research at the University of California’s School of Public Health found that getting eye contact and a pat on the back from the doctor may boost the survival rate of patients with complex diseases.

5 Stronger team dynamics. Paul Zak, the author of The Moral Molecule, argues, “We touch to initiate and sustain cooperation.” He conducted a “neuroeconomics” study from which he argues that hugs or handshakes are likely to cause the release of the neurochemical oxytocin, which increases the chances that a person will treat you “like family,” even if you just met.

6 More non-sexual emotional intimacy. Interpersonal touch has a powerful impact on our emotions. Studies have shown that a gentle brush of a woman’s arm can boost a man’s chances in love; another study showed that two-thirds of women agreed to dance with a man who touched her on the arm a second or two before making the request.

7 Greater learning engagement. When teachers touch students platonically, it encourages their learning. French psychologist Nicolas Guéguen reports (link is external)
 that when teachers pat students in a friendly way, those students are three times as likely to speak up in class. Another recent study has found that when librarians pat the hand of a student checking out a book, that student says he or she likes the library more and is more likely to return.

8 Overall wellbeing. Adults require human touch to thrive. Keltner says, “In recent years, a wave of studies has documented some incredibly emotional and physical health benefits that come from touch. This research is suggesting that touch is truly fundamental to human communication, bonding, and health.”  As Sharon K. Farber says, “Being touched and touching someone else are fundamental modes of human interaction, and increasingly, many people are seeking out their own professional touches and body arts teachers—chiropractors, physical therapists, Gestalt therapists, Rolfers, the Alexander-technique and Feldenkrais people, massage therapists, martial arts and T’ai Chi Ch’uan instructors. And some even wait in physicians’ offices for a physical examination for ailments with no organic cause—they wait to be touched.”

 

In conclusion: Physical touch is the foundational element of human development and culture. The growing preoccupation with digital media versus personal physical contact, combined with the social and legal restrictions over the physical contact in our schools and workplaces, may unintentionally affect these factors negatively. To foster a safe social environment in a climate of mediated communication, we should intentionally hold on to physical touch.

 

 

Sensory receptors in human skin

 

 

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It all starts in the bottom layer of our skin. There, a series of informational conveyor belts called Merkel cells, feed data from the skin to the body’s central nervous system. The body then responds with a surge of hormones. And, if you’re receiving the right kind of touch — as opposed to a creepy one or a punch in the nose — you’ll get a dose of oxytocin, the aptly named “cuddle hormone.”

The results are palpable. Spearheaded by labs throughout the country that are dedicated to the science of touch, a slew of new studies are proving that touch — gentle, empathetic, and supportive — comes with incredible emotional and physical health benefits. “Touch is our body’s largest and the oldest sense,” says Jeanne AbateMarco, MS, RN, CNS, clinical nurse coordinator of the Department of Integrative Health Programs at NYU Langone Medical Center. “It’s a channel of communication. It’s integral to the human experience.”

 

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But, no two touches are the same.

From:http://www.livescience.com/35219-11-effects-of-oxytocin.html

 

 

Oxytocin

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Oxytocin the so-called “love hormone” is being increasingly shown to trigger a wide variety of physical and psychological effects in both women and men.
The hormone’s influence on our behavior and physiology originates in the brain, where it’s produced by the by a structure called the hypothalamus, and then transfers to the pituitary gland which releases into the bloodstream. Like antennas picking up a signal, oxytocin receptors are found on cells throughout the body. Levels of the hormone tend to be higher during both stressful and socially bonding experiences, according to the American Psychological Association.
“It’s like a hormone of attachment, you might say,” said Carol Rinkleib Ellison, a clinical psychologist in private practice in Loomis, California and former assistant clinical psychiatry professor at the University of California, San Francisco. “It creates feelings of calm and closeness.”
Though scientists have long known about oxytocin’s role in breastfeeding and childbirth, “We’re just learning more about it now,” Ellison said.

 

A stream of studies in the last decade has focused on oxytocin’s effects on body and mind. Here’s a look at what we’ve learned.

Though often referred to as the “trust hormone” oxytocin is increasingly being seen as a brain chemical that does a lot more than just bring couples closer together.

New research is suggesting that oxytocin plays a crucial part in enabling us to not just forge and strengthen our social relations, but in helping us to stave off a number of psychological and physiological problems as well. But more conceptually, oxytocin is proving to be a crucial ingredient to what makes us human. Here are ten reasons why oxytocin is simply the most incredible molecule on the planet:

 

1. It’s easy to get

One of the neat things about oxytocin is that you can get your fix anywhere and at any time. All you need to do is simply hug someone or shake their hand. The simple act of bodily contact will cause your brain to release low levels of oxytocin — both in yourself and in the person you’re touching. It’s a near-instantaneous way to establish trust. And the good news is that the effect lingers afterward. There’s even evidence that simply gazing at someone will do the trick — or even just thinking about them. And you shouldn’t feel limited by the human species; it also helps to hug and play with your pets. And for those who can’t produce enough oxytocin on their own, or who feel they could use a boost, the molecule can be easily synthesized and administered as a drug.

 

2. A love potion that’s built right in

Often referred to as the “love molecule”, oxytocin is typically associated with helping couples establish a greater sense of intimacy and attachment. Oxytocin, along with dopamine and norepinephrine, is believed to be highly critical in human pair-bonding. But not only that, it also increases the desire for couples to gaze at one another, it creates sexual arousal, and it helps males maintain their erections. When you’re sexually aroused or excited, oxytocin levels increase in your brain significantly — a primary factor for bringing about an orgasm. And during the orgasm itself, the brain is flooded with oxytocin — a possible explanation for why (some) couples like to cuddle after.

 

3. It helps mom to be a mom

But oxytocin isn’t just limited to helping couples come together — it’s an indispensable part of childbirth and mother-child bonding. Oxytocin helps women get through labor by stimulating uterine contractions, which is why it’s sometimes administered (as Pitocin) during labor. It’s been known to promote delivery and speed up contractions. After birth, mothers can establish intimacy and trust with their baby through gentle touches and even a loving gaze. In addition, mothers can pass on oxytocin to their babies through breast milk. And it’s worth noting that fathers can reap the benefits of oxytocin as well; new dads who are given a whiff of oxytocin nasal spray are more likely to encourage their children to explore during playtime and are less likely to be hostile.

 

4.Reduces social fears

Given its ability to break down social barriers, induce feelings of optimism, increase self-esteem, and build trust, oxytocin is increasingly being seen as something that can help people overcome their social inhibitions and fears. Studies are showing that it may be effective in treating debilitating shyness or to help people with social anxieties and mood disorders. It’s also thought that oxytocin could help people suffering from the post-traumatic stress disorder. In addition, given that autism is essentially a social communication disorder, it’s being considered as a way of helping people on the spectrum as well. And lastly, oxytocin, through its trust-building actions, can help heal the wounds of a damaged relationship — another example of how the mind gets its plasticity.

 

5. Healing and pain relief

Amazingly, oxytocin can also be used to heal wounds (through its anti-inflammatory properties). Studies have also shown that a rise in oxytocin levels can relieve pain — everything from headaches, cramps, and overall body aches. Now, that being said, the trick is to get some oxytocin action while you’re in pain — which is not so easy. This is where synthetics can certainly help. Alternately, if you find yourself in physical discomfort, you could always ask your partner for a roll in the hay. So guys, be sure to use this crucial information the next time your significant other declines your advances and tells you she has a headache.

 

6. A diet aid

Perhaps surprisingly, it can also be used to prevent obesity in some instances. Researchers have observed that oxytocin and oxytocin receptor-deficient mice become obese later in life — and with normal food intake. Scientists believe that the hormone might be responsible for a series of beneficial metabolic effects, both in mice and humans. Moreover, by giving oxytocin-deficient obese mice oxytocin infusions, their weight returned back to normal levels. The mice also showed a reduced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. This clearly suggests an alternative option for those struggling to keep the weight off.

 

7. An antidepressant

Oxytocin was first observed to have a connection to depression through its effects on mothers suffering from the postpartum syndrome. Researchers found that some new mothers were dealing with depression on account of low levels of oxytocin. In fact, they were able to predict postpartum during the pregnancy if the expectant mother had low levels of oxytocin. Recent studies of blood levels and genetic factors in depressed patients have revealed the potential for treating people with clinical depression and even anxiety disorders.

 

8. Stress relief

Not surprisingly, given its ability to alleviate social anxiety and produce feelings of trust, oxytocin has the peripheral ability to reduce stress — which is no small thing when you consider the toll that stress takes on the body. Oxytocin has been observed to reduce cortisol in the body and lower blood pressure. It’s also been known to improve digestion, which is often disturbed by high-stress levels. Interestingly, oxytocin and the oxytocin receptors have been found in the intestinal tract; it improves gut motility and decreases intestinal inflammation.

 

9. Increases generosity

In what could be seen as either a good or bad thing, oxytocin has been observed to increase generosity in humans. Evolutionary biologists, particularly those who subscribe to the selfish gene theory, have long struggled to understand why people sometimes share or give away things — often at a personal cost. But several lines of research have connected oxytocin to feelings of empathy. In one study that required persons to share money with a stranger, infusions of oxytocin were shown to make some subjects as much as 80% (wow!) more generous than those on a placebo.

 

10. It’s what makes us human

In other words, all the above. It’s clear that we really wouldn’t be human without it — we would simply lack the ability to be the social, caring species that we are. Now, it should be noted, however, that, while oxytocin increases in-group trust, it produces the opposite feeling for those in the out-group — so it’s not the “perfect drug” some might proclaim it to be. That being said, oxytocin plays a crucial role in forging our ability to spark and maintain relationships, while endowing us with the ability to empathize, trust, and even love one another. Without it, we would be something significantly less than what we are.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bee Venom For Beauty And Wellness Part Two

Honeybee venom

 

 

Welcome to one of my favorite subjects. We intend to provide you the reader with accurate content.

Here on week 25, we are sharing the magical life of Bees and their products these little beings dedicate their entire life to pollinate and produce the products described in this post we wish for the information to make a difference on how you perceive Bees. Most people are afraid of them and don’t like them, and we think the reason for that is that people don’t know how much they benefit our Ecology and our entire wellbeing. Let’s honor them by giving them the chance to know them better, enjoy and let’s share it so many can benefit.

Honeybee venom is composed of two glands associated with the sting apparatus of worker bees. Its production increases during the first two weeks of the adult worker’s life and reaches a maximum when the worker bee becomes involved in hive defense and foraging. It diminishes as the bee gets older. The queen bee’s production of venom is highest on emergence, which allows her to be prepared for immediate battles with other queens.

When a bee stings, it does not normally inject all of the 0.15 to 0.3 mg of venom held in a full venom sac (Schumacher et al., 1989 and Crane 1990, respectively). Only when it stings an animal with skin as tough as ours will it lose its sting – and with it the whole sting apparatus, including the venom sac, muscles, and the nerve center. These nerves and muscles, however, keep injecting venom for a while, or until the venom sac is empty. The loss of such a considerable portion of its body is almost always fatal to the bee.
Used in small doses, however, bee venom can be of benefit in treating a large number of ailments. This therapeutic value was already known to many ancient civilizations and now is much documentation on its benefits.

Honeybee venom is a clear, odorless, watery liquid. When coming into contact with mucous membranes or eyes, it causes considerable burning and irritation. Dried venom takes on a light yellow color and some commercial preparations are brown, thought to be due to oxidation of some of the venom proteins. The venom contains a number of very volatile compounds which are easily lost during collection.

88% of venom is water. The glucose, fructose and phospholipid contents of venom are similar to those in the bee’s blood (Crane, 1990). At least 18 pharmacologically active components have been described, including various enzymes, peptides, and amines. Detailed information on the components is available in the Krell document noted below.

(taken from Krell, R.,“Value-Added Products from Bee-Keeping,”
FAO Agricultural Services Bulletin #124, 1996)

 

 

 

 

 

Dried  Bee venom

 

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Bee venom, also known as apitoxin or apis mellifera. These two proteins are one of the keys to healthy skin. Collagen gives skin its elasticity and strength, and a reduction in collagen (sparked by the natural aging process) can lead to wrinkles and fine lines dan sagging skin.

Meanwhile, elastin is essential for the production of elastic fibers in the body. These small groups of proteins help to give strength and flexibility to our connective tissues all over our bodies, providing structural support for skin, the heart, lungs, and other organs.

Products made with purified bee venom can help to moisturize skin while providing so many benefits.

In most cases, application of these creams, moisturizers, masks, and cleansers will feel much like an ordinary beauty product, although it may induce some micro-swelling (light plumping) in the area as it works.

It’s important to remember that if you do have a severe allergy to bee stings, it’s best to seek advice from your doctor before using any products containing bee venom that is a must.

The main component in apitoxin is melittin amounting to 52 % of venom peptides.

Other components of Bee Venom are:

  • Apamin increases cortisol production in the adrenal gland. Apamin is a mild neurotoxin.
  • Adolapin, contributing 2–5% of the peptides, acts as an anti-inflammatory and analgesic because it blocks cyclooxygenase.
  • Phospholipase A2 amounts to 10–12% of peptides and it is the most destructive component of apitoxin. It is an enzyme which degrades the phospholipids which cellular membranes are made of. It also causes decreased blood pressure and inhibits blood coagulation. Phospholipase A2 activates arachidonic acid which is metabolized in the cyclooxygenase-cycle to form prostaglandins. Prostaglandins regulate the body’s inflammatory response.
  • Hyaluronidase contributing 1–3% of peptides dilates the capillaries causing the spread of inflammation.
  • Histamine contributing 0.5–2% and is involved in the allergic response.
  • Dopamine and noradrenaline which contribute 1–2% increase in pulse rate.
  • Protease-inhibitors contribute 2% and act as anti-inflammatory agents and stop bleeding.
  • Tertiapin.

 

According to: http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/NaturalFood/Bee

Honeybee venom contains at least 18 active substances. Melittin, being the most prevalent substance, is one of the most potent anti-inflammatory agents known (100 times more potent than hydrocortisol). Adolapin is another strong anti-inflammatory substance, and inhibits cyclooxygenase; it thus has analgesic activity as well. Apamin inhibits complement C3 activity and blocks calcium-dependent potassium channels, thus enhancing nerve transmission.

Other substances, such as Compound X, Hyaluronidase, Phospholipase A2, Histamine, and Mast Cell Degranulating Protein (MSDP), are involved in the inflammatory response of venom, with the softening of tissue and the facilitation of flow of the other substances. Finally, there are measurable amounts of the neurotransmitters Dopamine, Norepinephrine and Seratonin.

 

 

 

The composition of bee venom and its properties

apitherapy

Bee venom is a complex substance, the chemical composition of which are enzymes, proteins, amines (histamine, choline), volatile oils, evaporating during the drying of poison. And acids (hydrochloric, phosphoric, formic) and substances such as hormones of the adrenal cortex.

Let us consider the properties of bee venom, which he has:

– Improves fat metabolism, which in turn regulates cholesterol metabolism, reducing its concentration in the blood;

– Enhances the action of enzymes and hormones;

– Stimulates the “adrenal glands – the pituitary gland”;

– Assists in the concretionary bones as facilitating this process;

– Has anti-inflammatory effects;

– Thanks to the analgesic, antispasmodic and vasodilatory action, bee venom is often used for children to relieve pain in the abdomen;

– Contains substances which lower the body temperature;

– Has a positive effect on the central nervous system;

– Strengthens the immune system;

– Has antiarrhythmic action and the ability to stimulate the heart;

– Restore the myelin sheath of nerve fibers, resulting in normal nerve impulse;

– Improves sexual function;

– Contributes to the removal of salts from the human body;

– Stimulates brain activity;

– Increases the elasticity of the connective tissue;

– Improves hearing, memory, and vision.

Thus, bee venom is a unique substance, the positive properties of which are not fully understood until now. However, the effect of bee venom is widely used in modern medicine for the effective treatment of almost all of the human body.

 

 

 

Health benefits of honey bee venom (apitoxin)

 

 

Bee venom benefits

from: http://www.diyhomeremedies.net/health-benefits-honey-bee-venom-apitoxin/

Honeybee venom (apitoxin) has anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antibacterial, and antipyretic properties.

It is known as an effective natural remedy for rheumatism and pain relief.

Also, it is effective against insomnia, migraine, energy, immunity, increases appetite. Generally, honey bee venom (apitoxin) is an excellent prevention against infectious diseases.

Russian scientists have discovered that honey bee venom (apitoxin) has the ability to expand blood vessels, which improves blood circulation and metabolism.

Due to irritation, at the time of bite immune system activates wherein the blood begins to circulate and stronger circulation and higher oxidation prevent bacterial growth.

Honeybee venom (apitoxin) opens capillary walls, allowing the body easily and quickly discharge of waste substances. In this way, the metabolism accelerates, and the body is filled with oxygen.

Honeybee venom (apitoxin) therapy has proven to be useful in :

  • arthrosis and arthritis
  • inflammation of nerves (neuritis, sciatica)
  • multiple sclerosis
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • cerebral palsy
  • high blood pressure
  • high cholesterol
  • poor circulation
  • inflammation of blood vessels
  • asthma and allergies
  • urticaria
  • psoriasis
  • wounds and scars
  • inflammation of the ovaries and fallopian tubes
  • addiction

 

 

Egyptian Bee Keeper

 

 

egyptian-beekeepers

Therapies involving the honeybee have existed for thousands of years and some may be as old as human medicine itself. The ancient rock art in the caves of early hunter-gatherers depicts the honeybee as a source of natural medicine. Bee venom therapy was practiced in ancient Egypt, Greece, and China—three Great Civilizations known for their highly developed medical systems. Hippocrates, the Greek physician known as the “Father of Medicine”, recognized the healing virtues of bee venom for treating arthritis and other joint problems he knew about it. Today, growing scientific evidence suggests that various bee products promote healing by improving circulation, decreasing inflammation, and stimulating a healthy immune response.

It is important to note that Apitherapy is not only the use of the venom for healing, often called Bee Sting Therapy, but the use of all the hive products, and usually a combination of them.  These products are also sometimes mixed with other ingredients, specifically different essential oils, dependent on the condition being treated.

The more modern study of apitherapy, specifically bee venom, was initiated through the efforts of Austrian physician Philip Terc in his published results “Report about a Peculiar Connection between the Bee Stings and Rheumatism” in 1888. Bodog Beck (Budapest, Hugary 1871 – NYC, 1942) followed Terc, and brought Apitherapy to the United States.  More recent popularity has been credited to Charles Mraz (1905 – 1999), a beekeeper from Vermont, who knew Beck.  Some of the Board Members of the American Apitherapy Society, as well as some general AAS members, have been trained by and/or treated and inspired by Mraz.  The Society’s annual educational and training event, CMACC, is named for him, the Charles Mraz Apitherapy Course and Conference.

Do Bee Venom Beauty Treatments Work?

 

 

Celebrities and Bee venom

In the last couple of years there has been a lot of buzz in the press and the media about bee venom products and the benefits being gained by various actresses, celebrities and royalty using them, I personally got introduce to stover forty years ago by my mother she always used royal jelly and all Bee products. But before rushing out to buy it wouldn’t you like to know just a bit more about what bee venom can or can’t do for you? Always be conscientious of your tolerance to bee products, and by that, I mean allergies to bees ) Bee venom treatments aren’t a new addition to beauty and health treatments, they have been around for centuries, but it’s only recently that the benefits have become public knowledge and approved in safety for public use.

We are always on the lookout for products that can help us to get rid of wrinkles and fine lines or to rejuvenate our skin to its original youthful glow, and this is where bee venom creams and masks seem to play a significant role in restoring elasticity and radiance to your skin. So, the next question is, do bee venom treatments really work and will they be suitable for you? I have used them for at least a couple of decades and yes they work to be realistic that your style of life plays a huge role in the overall health and that includes your skin!!

 

 

What Are Bee Venom Beauty Treatments?

 

The Chinese and the Greeks used bee venom treatments for centuries, but it is only until recently that we have recognized their benefits as part of a daily beauty regimen. Aging, unfortunately for the ones that can’t accept it, is a fact of life but that doesn’t mean we can’t take steps to ease into the process, fine lines and sagging skin. Theisa range of specialized bee venom treatments, including bee venom masks and bee venom, it’s creams and even injectable form to provide the essential components to rejuvenate and restore your skin close to its former state, here let’s be realistic also it doesn’t do plastic surgery.

 

 

How Does Bee Venom Work?

 

Bee venom is a clear, odorless liquid that’s injected into your skin when a honeybee stings you. It consists of more than 20 known compounds, the most prominent being melittin, a protein that boasts powerful anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-viral properties. Most products that contain bee venom act in a somewhat similar manner when placed on your skin, though the effects can vary from person to person. Basically, bee venom sort of tricks your skin and its mild irritant properties make your skin believe that it is under “attack”. Consequently, your skin reacts by producing more elastin and collagen plus the blood circulation to the facial skin also increases all resulting in a healing effect. The end result is plumper, firmer and smoother skin.

Using bee venom treatments on a regular basis can result in a massive transformation of your skin. You should also make sure that you include your neck and decolletage (chest area) in your bee venom regime since it is equally exposed to sun and air pollutants and it’s often overlooked. The bee venom creams can be used overnight and work on the skin even when you sleep. The bee venom masks need to be applied then left on for 15- 20 minutes before washing off with water, and you will usually feel immediate results after a bee venom mask treatment. A combined use of bee venom masks and bee venom cream will result in the cleansing, tightening, softening and nourishing of your facial skin.

 

 

What Else Should You Know About Bee Venom Treatments?

 

 

Bee venom is unique in regard to beauty benefits but a small word of caution at this point – anyone who is allergic to bee products should not use bee venom treatments. They can lead to severe reactions for some people. Always test any product before you start using it on a regular basis and then begin your journey to a permanently good-looking skin.

three in one solution

So how does it work?

 

As skin ages, it loses its naturally-occurring collagen which results in sagging skin and fine lines and wrinkles. Sometimes referred to as nature’s Botox, bee venom therapy works to reverse the effects of aging by encouraging the stimulation of natural collagen and elastin.
Applying small amounts of bee venom creams to the skin fools it into thinking it has been stung. Blood is sent to the affected area which in turn stimulates the production of collagen, which strengthens body tissue, and elastin, which helps the skin stay firm and youthful. Regular users of bee venom therapy beauty products like eye cream, venom masks, ointment and, serum can notice a number of benefits including improved skin texture and firmness, the reduction of pores, fine lines and wrinkles, and reduced pigmentation and sun damage.
It’s important to reiterate that you shouldn’t just squeeze the venom out of a bee and dab it on your wrinkles. The difference between a bee venom cream and an actual bee sting is the dosage. Bee venom beauty products like eye cream, moisturizer, venom mask and venom ointment contain a low-dose variant of bee venom, which means a user can still enjoy the skincare benefits it provides without actually being stung.
Bee venom by itself is excellent for an instant skin lift and plump-up, but if it’s left on your skin for too long at one time, it can result in a similar reaction to an actual bee sting. To avoid the angry response while still harnessing the power of nature, bee venom is often combined with New Zealand Manuka honey. Not just famous for our organic skincare ranges, we produce New Zealand Manuka honey which is internationally recognized for its healing and overall health benefits. It has anti-inflammatory properties which help to reduce possible redness that might be caused by the application of bee venom, while its anti-bacterial benefits assist with any possible skin infection. Bee venom and New Zealand Manuka honey combos come in venom masks, eye creams, moisturizers and a wide range of cosmetics and ointments.
However, the one-star ingredient that’s been gaining a steady buzz over the past few years is the use of bee venom to promote positive effects in human skin. Its inherent properties have earned it the nickname of ‘nature’s botox’, and even Kate Middleton reportedly used a face mask with bee venom as part of her wedding preparations.

 

 

 

But is it safe for the bees?

Bee-Venom-Collector

from: http://www.prevention.com/beauty/natural-beauty/bee-venom-beauty-trend-killing-bees

When a bee stings a person, it dies because it no longer has its stinger. Collecting bee venom, on the other hand, is not harmful or stressful for the bees. A glass sheet is placed into the beehive along with a very weak electrical current running through it. When bees sit on the glass, the weak current encourages them to stick out their stingers and pump out a small amount of venom. As each bee releases its venom, it also releases pheromones which tell the other bees to sting the glass too. The venom sticks to the glass, which is then removed from the beehive and the venom collected and purified.
And in case you were wondering, collecting bee venom does not contribute to colony collapse disorder, the unusually high levels of hive loss reported by beekeepers beginning in 2006. That’s caused by a cocktail of diseases, parasites, poor nutrition, and environmental stressors like pesticides and limited water access say the USDA. Fras has noticed that the bees he stimulates for venom even yield more honey than their non-stimulated counterparts. “I don’t know if [the stimulation] has anything to do with it, but we definitely haven’t seen a negative impact [on the bees].”
But even if bee venom collection turns out to be a positive for bees, know that us humans can definitely get too much of a good thing. “We’ve heard of people using bee venom two or three times a day, and that’s not something we recommend. It’s a matter of your personal preference and tolerance level, but using bee venom two or three times a week is more than enough to achieve the desired effects,” says Fras.

 

 

The venom is harvested from bees without causing them any harm.

 

 

 

 

 

from: http://www.manukadoctor.com/purified-bee-venom

 

That means you can rest assured no bees were harmed in the making of your beauty product, and you can look forward to seeing the results of this wonder ingredient on your skin.
Purified Bee Venom (PBV™) is an industry first from Manuka Doctor. Because venom can contain contaminants from handling and collection, we established a process to ensure only the purest of ingredients go into our products and on your skin.
Each batch of PBV™ is tested for its composition and recorded for quality control and tracking purposes. If it doesn’t meet our strict specifications for purity and toxicity testing, it is immediately rejected.
Our highly trained beekeepers undergo regular learning for quality controlled bee venom collection. Research has proven that the quality of our bee venom is of a clinical patient treatment standard. In Korea, where extensive testing of bee venom has taken place, leading researcher Dr. Sang Mi Han concluded that there is no guarantee that other bee venom sources would give the same results as Purified Bee Venom. However, the one-star ingredient that’s been gaining a steady buzz over the past few years is the use of bee venom to promote positive effects in human skin. Its inherent properties have earned it the nickname of ‘nature’s botox,’ and even Kate Middleton reportedly used a face mask with bee venom as part of her wedding preparations.

 

Here are some fascinating facts

 

The honey bee has been around for millions of years.
Honey bees, scientifically also known as Apis mellifera, are environmentally friendly and are vital as pollinators.
It is the only insect that produces food eaten by man.
Bee Venom has evolved beyond a physical defense against predators, to be a colony protector.
Honey is the only food that includes all the substances necessary to sustain life, including enzymes, vitamins, minerals, and water; and it’s the only food that contains “pinocembrin,” an antioxidant associated with improved brain functioning.
Honey bees have 170 odorant receptors, compared with only 62 in fruit flies and 79 in mosquitoes. Their exceptional olfactory abilities include kin recognition signals, social communication within the hive, and odor recognition for finding food. Their sense of smell was so precise that it could differentiate hundreds of different floral varieties and tell whether a flower carried pollen or nectar from meters away.
The honey bee’s wings stroke incredibly fast, about 200 beats per second, thus making their famous, distinctive buzz. A honey bee can fly for up to six miles, and as fast as 15 miles per hour.
The average worker bee produces about 1/12th teaspoon of honey in her lifetime.
A hive of bees will fly 90,000 miles, the equivalent of three orbits around the earth to collect 1 kg of honey.
It takes one ounce of honey to fuel a bee’s flight around the world.
A honey bee visits 50 to 100 flowers during a collection trip.
The bee’s brain is oval in shape and only about the size of a sesame seed, yet it has a remarkable capacity to learn and remember things and is able to make complex calculations on distance traveled and foraging efficiency.
A colony of bees consists of 20,000-60,000 honeybees and one queen. Worker honey bees are female, live for about 6 weeks and do all the work.
The queen bee can live up to 5 years and is the only bee that lays eggs. She is the busiest in the summer months when the hive needs to be at its maximum strength and lays up to 2500 eggs per day.
More significant than the worker bees, the male honey bees (also called drones), have no stinger and do no work at all. All they do is mating.
Each honey bee colony has a unique odor for members’ identification.
During winter, honey bees feed on the honey they collected during the warmer months. They form a tight cluster in their hive to keep the queen and themselves warm.

 

 

 

 

RENOVE VEE TOX Anti Aging Cream and wrinkle treatment

 

AN ANTI-AGING CREAM THAT WORKS – Renove Vee Tox Bee Venom Mask brings to you two of the best anti-aging ingredients, Bee Venom (purified) & Manuka Honey (Active 15+), that are completely organic & gentle – Say goodbye to cosmetic injections/fillersRenove VEE TOX Advanced Hydration Cream

 

Hydration is the key to any effective anti-aging regimen.
VEETOX Advanced Hydration Cream is the ultimate anti-aging cream, made to reveal the beauty within, at any age. Each and every ingredient is all-natural without any hidden parabens.
No artificial fragrances or synthetic preservatives that can be harmful or irritating.
Key Ingredients: Hyaluronic Acid, Manuka Honey, Bee Venom, Swiss Apple Stem Cell Extract, Beech Tree Bud Extract, Crembe Oil, & Vigna Aconitifolia Seed ExtractRENOVE VEE TOX Bee Venom Mask Anti-Aging Cream w/Manuka Honey (15+) 

AN ANTI-AGING CREAM THAT WORKS – Renove Vee Tox Bee Venom Mask brings to you two amazing anti-aging ingredients, Bee Venom (purified) & Manuka Honey (Active 15+), that are organic & gentle AND effective.
FOR YOUTHFUL SKIN – Pure Bee Venom in this face mask stimulates the production of elastin & collagen that work together to tighten your skin, help ease wrinkles, and reduce the appearance of aging.

 

beeco, Pure New Zealand Bee Venom Mask

 

Rare New Zealand Bee Venom extract works to naturally lift and firm the skin, eliminating the need for cosmetic injections or fillers.
The Abeeco Bee Venom Mask formulation combines a proprietary blend of magical New Zealand Bee Venom, soothing Manuka Honey as well as natural essential oils and nutrients to promote plump and youthful skin.

 

Medicine Mama’s Apothecary Sweet Bee Magic All In One Healing Skin Cream

 

HEALS DRY SKIN with immediate and lasting moisture
SOOTHES & RELIEVES red, itchy, or sunburnt skin
CELLULAR NUTRITION Delivers optimal cellular nutrition and support
REPAIRS minor cuts, scrapes and burns and Improves texture and tone of skin
MAGIC Sweet Bee Magic™ is gentle and safe to use on even the most sensitive or acne prone skin. Our carefully chosen organic oils and beeswax do not clog pores. Perfect for daily use by all ages, skin types and genders.

 

 

 

 

 

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