Halloween History, Tutorials, Recipes, Pumpkin Carving, and More…

 

Hello everybody, first of all, we would like to thank you for your enormous support and the thousands of visits and loving messages, we are so thankful.

On week 58 we are sharing fantastic insights to Halloween culture, foods, and pumpkin carvings by one of the most talented artists, a lot of research and love has gone into the post, enjoy share and like if you do, be safe and remember your health so let’s consume small amounts of SUGAR, if possible, nowadays we find many products sugar free.

 

Here is a video from the most amazing makeup artist Rick Baker

Here is a gift from us, the tutorials from Rick Baker, WOW! what a treat from a master. He has set such an example for all of us in the make-up industry, he is excellence and perfection with such grace. We are honored to share these with you.

We thought that it would be fun to share carving pumpkins with an amazing artist and sculptor as Andy Bergholtz. WOW! again another gift to complete Halloween post #1. We added some fun easy recipes, enjoy and share with your friends and family and don’t forget to click LIKE to keep us going, thank you, thank you from all of us.

We wish you health, happiness, and your ideal success.

 

 

 

History of Halloween

from www.halloweenhistory.org

Halloween is a holiday celebrated on the night of October 31. The word Halloween is a shortening of All Hallows’ Evening also known as Hallowe’en or All Hallows’ Eve.

Traditional activities include trick-or-treating, bonfires, costume parties, visiting “haunted houses” and carving jack-o-lanterns. Irish and Scottish immigrants carried versions of the tradition to North America in the nineteenth century. Other western countries embraced the holiday in the late twentieth century including Ireland, the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico, and the United Kingdom as well as of Australia and New Zealand.

 

 

Halloween has its origins in the ancient Celtic festival known as Samhain (pronounced “sah-win”).
The festival of Samhain is a celebration of the end of the harvest season in Gaelic culture. Samhain was a time used by the ancient pagans to take stock of supplies and prepare for winter. The ancient Gaels believed that on October 31, the boundaries between the worlds of the living and the dead overlapped and the deceased would come back to life and cause havoc such as sickness or damaged crops.

The festival would frequently involve bonfires. It is believed that the fires attracted insects to the area which attracted bats to the area. These are additional attributes of the history of Halloween.

Masks and costumes were worn in an attempt to mimic the evil spirits or appease them.

 

Makeup Examples for Reference

eye make up halloween

Pumpkin Enchanted Forest

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maxresdefault yelow hair

 

 

5-Cateye with black cat

 

Make up by Rick Baker

 

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Face Painting by Alexander-khokhlov

Black and white faces alexander-khokhlov-12

 

 

Orange and red dia de los Muertos

 

Trick-or-treating, is an activity for children on or around Halloween in which they proceed from house to house in costumes, asking for treats such as confectionery with the question, “Trick or treat?” The “trick” part of “trick or treat” is a threat to play a trick on the homeowner or his property if no treat is given. Trick-or-treating is one of the main traditions of Halloween. It has become socially expected that if one lives in a neighborhood with children one should purchase treats in preparation for trick-or-treaters.

 

 

Halloween around the world

 

from: http://www.novareinna.com/festive/world.html and http://www.travelchannel.com/interests/haunted/articles/halloween-around-the-world

 

As one of the world’s oldest holidays, Halloween is still celebrated today in several countries around the globe, but it is in North America and Canada that it maintains its highest level of popularity. Every year, 65% of Americans decorate their homes and offices for Halloween…a percentage exceeded only by Christmas. Halloween is the holiday when the most candy is sold and is second only to Christmas in terms of total sales.

 

Snap-Apple_Night

 

Ireland

 

The traditional birthplace of Halloween, Ireland is, naturally, home to one of the biggest celebrations: the Spirits of Meath Halloween Festival in County Meath, where an ancient Celtic festival we now know as Halloween began more than 2,000 years ago. Throughout the country, Halloween is welcomed with bonfires, party games and traditional food, such as barmbrack, an Irish fruitcake that contains coins, buttons, rings and other fortune telling objects; and, of course, beer (among other drinks of choice). Fortunetelling is part of the old Irish Halloween tradition. If a young woman gets a ring that has been baked in a pastry or bread or even mashed potatoes, then she’ll be married by next Halloween. Tricks are also part of the Irish Halloween scene. Kids knock on doors, then run away before the doors get opened by the owner. Hopefully, this takes place after they’ve already acquired the candy during a previous foray through the neighborhood.

 

 

france

France

 

Halloween, the three millennia old, famous folklore celebration has its roots in the Celtic and the Anglo-Saxon world let see when and how did it get to France? How do the French people celebrate Halloween? Let’s take a closer look.

Halloween, as a folk celebration, only appeared in France in the 80’s and at that time was only celebrated by the English-speaking communities in bars or restaurants, not by all the French people. The French people only became familiar with Halloween at the beginning of the 90’s. In 1992 the company César who specialized in fancy dress costumes decided to work on a way to settle in France and market their products but THE year of the massive marketing launching was 1997 when American companies such as Disneyland, Coca-Cola, and McDonald’s began using Halloween images in publicity campaigns in France. Even the French telecommunication society France Telecom commercialized an orange cell-phone named Olaween related to the holiday.

In France, Halloween is usually celebrated by young people in costumes going to parties at friends’ places, or clubs. The costumes themselves tend to be traditionally “scary” (vampires, ghosts, and witches, rather than costumes like princesses, superheroes or even policemen or nurses which are popular in the United States and Great Britain they really cater to scary.

Stores and commercial centers decorate their windows and pastry and candy shops sell sweets and chocolate using the theme of Halloween.

French children also go from house to house trick-or-treating, which is translated as «des bonbons ou des coups de bâton » in French.

Controversial Halloween

 

Halloween in France nowadays is rather controversial, due to several reasons. One of the main reasons is that traditionally between October 31st and November 2nd, the French, particularly the older generations, visit cemeteries, honor saints, and attend religious services. Therefore, Halloween is seen as a distraction and a lack of respect to these celebrations of dead people.

Nowadays, Halloween is taking root in France. And, of course, the French love to dress up and have a party by culture. The jury is still out on if Halloween is gonna stick, but you can be sure that when Yves St. Laurent puts a Halloween costume on the fashion runway, the French take notice.

Nowadays, shops and trademarks use the images of Halloween, pumpkins, skeletons Bats, ghost etc… in their ads, so now, French people know it well, and some even start to celebrate Halloween with their kids. Why not? is so much fun for the whole family. The French traditionally love to get in costumes, and it’s quite common to have a costumed New Year party or a costumed birthday, even more so among kids.

 

 

Halloween-Mexico

 

Mexico

 

No nation celebrates the dead with festivities better than Mexico. In fact, “Dia de Los Muertos” (Day of the Dead), is celebrated over several days, from Oct. 31 through Nov. 2. It’s not Halloween at all, but rather a way that All Souls Day comes to life in Mexico. The celebration offers a chance to remember the deceased, tell their stories and celebrate their lives. Family feasts, skull-shaped sweets, lots of tequila, dancing and mariachi music, as well as parades of people dressed as skeletons, all ensure that one’s ancestors are well remembered. The celebration is embraced across Mexico, with huge festivities even in the smallest of villages.

 

Halloween Germany

 

Germany

 

In Germany, Halloween is celebrated as All Saints Day. In southern Germany, it’s celebrated from October 30 to November 8. Typically, in this and many other Catholic parts of the world, the All Saints Day is spent attending church, honoring the saints who have died for the Catholic faith, as well as visiting and remembering dead family members, usually graveside. Additionally, Germans hide their knives, so the returning spirits presumably won’t get harmed by random knife movements during the day.

 

Austria

 

Austria

 

In Austria, some people will leave bread, water, and a lighted lamp on the table before retiring on Halloween night. The reason for this is because it was once believed such items would welcome the dead souls back to earth on a night which for the Austrians was considered to be brimming with strong cosmic energies.

 

Belgium

 

Belgium

 

The Belgians believe that it is unlucky for a black cat to cross once’s path and also unlucky if it should enter a home or travel on a ship. The custom in Belgium on Halloween night is to light candles in memory of dead relatives.

 

 

Canada

 

Halloween is celebrated in Canada on or around October 31. It is a day to mark the single night in the year when, according to old Celtic beliefs, spirits, and the dead can cross over into the world of the living. Some people hold parties and children may trick-or-treat in their neighborhood.

 

China

 

China

 

In China, the Halloween festival is known as Teng Chieh. Food and water are placed in front of photographs of family members who have departed while bonfires and lanterns are lit in order to light the paths of the spirits as they travel the earth on Haloween night. Worshippers in Buddhist temples fashion “boats of the law” from paper, some of which are very large, which are then burned in the evening hours. The purpose of this custom is twofold: as a remembrance of the dead and in order to free the spirits of the “pretas” in order that they might ascend to heaven. “Pretas” are the spirits of those who died as a result of an accident or drowning and whose bodies were consequently never buried. The presence of “pretas” among the living is thought by the Chinese to be dangerous. Under the guidance of Buddhist temples, societies are formed to carry out ceremonies for the “pretas,” which includes the lighting of lanterns. Monks are invited to recite sacred verses and offerings of fruit are presented.

 

Czechoslovakia

 

Czechoslovakia

 

In Czechoslovakia, chairs are placed by the fireside on Halloween night. There is one chair for each living family member and one for each family member’s spirit.

 

England

 

England

 

At one time, English children made “punkies” out of large beetroots, upon which they carved a design of their choice. Then, they would carry their “punkies” through the streets while singing the “Punkie Night Song” as they knocked on doors and asked for money. In some rural areas, turnip lanterns were placed on gateposts to protect homes from the spirits who roamed on Halloween night. Another custom was to toss objects such as stones, vegetables, and nuts into a bonfire to frighten away the spirits. These symbolic sacrifices were also employed as fortune-telling tools. If a pebble thrown into the flames at night was no longer visible in the morning, then it was believed that the person who tossed the pebble would not survive another year. If nuts tossed into the blaze by young lovers then exploded, it signified a quarrelsome marriage. For the most, part, however, the English ceased celebrating Halloween with the spread of Martin Luther’s Protestant Reformation. Since followers of the new religion did not believe in Saints, they saw no reason to celebrate the Eve of All Saints’ Day. However, in recent years, the American “trick or treating” custom, together with the donning of costumes for going door-to-door, has become a relatively popular pastime among English children at Halloween, although many of the adults (particularly the older generations) have little idea as to why they are being asked for sweets and are usually ill-prepared to accommodate their small and hopeful callers.

 

 

obon

 

 

Japan

 

The Japanese celebrate the “Obon Festival” (also known as “Matsuri” or “Urabon”) which is similar to Halloween festivities in that it is dedicated to the spirits of ancestors. Special foods are prepared and bright red lanterns are hung everywhere. Candles are lit and placed into lanterns which are then set afloat on rivers and seas. During the “Obon Festival,” a fire is lit every night in order to show the ancestors where their families might be found. “Obon” is one of the two main occasions during the Japanese year when the dead are believed to return to their birthplaces. Memorial stones are cleaned and community dances performed. The “Obon Festival” takes place during July or August.

 

chuseok

 

Korea

 

In Korea, the festival similar to Halloween is known as “Chusok.” It is at this time that families thank their ancestors for the fruits of their labor. The family pays respect to these ancestors by visiting their tombs and making offerings of rice and fruits. The “Chusok” festival takes place in the month of August.

 

Alla Helgons Dag

 

Sweden

 

In Sweden, Halloween is known as “Alla Helgons Dag” and is celebrated from October 31 until November 6. As with many other holidays, “Alla Helgons Dag” has an eve which is either celebrated or becomes a shortened working day. The Friday prior to All Saint’s Day is a short day for universities while school-age children are given a day of vacation.

halloween

United States

 

In the United States, people celebrate Halloween by wearing scary costumes. They also dress up like popular celebrities, children’s show characters, princesses, superheroes, and much more. After dressing up, kids go trick-or-treating. They go from house to house in their neighborhoods and ask for treats such as candies and snacks by saying, “Trick or treat!” According to tradition, if no treat is given, they can play a trick on the homeowners. The traditional scary and modern fun sides of Halloween are seen today as the Jack-o’-lanterns that people create by carving scary faces on pumpkins. Homeowners place Jack-o’-lanterns in front of their houses to scare evil spirits and to welcome trick-or-treaters. Other modern fun activities that reflect the traditional past of Halloween include watching horror movies and visiting haunted houses.

Strawberry Ghosts via Miss CandiQuik

Strawberry Ghosts_OS

 

These chocolate ghosts come together before you can say “Boo!” Just dunk ripe strawberries in melted white chocolate and let them cool on a baking sheet in the fridge. Add mini chocolate chip eyes and mouths and they’re ready for spooky snacking

 

 

Bat Bites

 

bat-bites

 

These bite-sized bats have an adult-friendly flavor from the goat cheese, cream cheese, and pesto mixture. The kids will love to shape the bats’ bodies, decorate their faces, and give them wings. Keep it simple by preparing just about everything ahead of time.

Ingredients

  • 1 (4 oz.) package cream cheese, softened
  • 8 ounces soft, mild goat cheese, at room temperature
  • 1/4 cup pesto
  • 2 tablespoons coarsely ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons poppy seeds
  • 8 pitted olives, sliced
  • 32 peppercorns
  • 32 triangular blue corn chips or free-form wing shapes made from leftover tortillas

Preparation

Mash together cream cheese, goat cheese, and pesto. Chill for 40 minutes.

Shape mixture into 16 2-inch balls, about 1 heaping tsp. each. Roll in black pepper and poppy seeds to cover. Press two olive slices into balls for eyes and place peppercorns in centers for pupils.

Insert chip on either side of the ball for wings; serve.

 

 

Snack-o’-Lantern Fruit Cups via Pennies on a Platter

Orange-Pumpkins_0

 

Looking for a festive way to serve dessert? Look no further — these carved-out oranges make a perfect container for fruit salad.

 

 

 

Halloween Green Tea Martinis

 

Martini halloween 9-22-14

Ingredients
• 2 ounces vodka
• 6 green tea bags
• 1-½ ounces fresh-squeezed lime juice
• 1/2 ounce agave nectar

Directions
1. Infuse a 750ml bottle of vodka with 6 teabags, 3 each of Numi Rainforest Green and Numi Ginger Sun, per instructions above.
2. Mix all ingredients except garnishes in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake for 15 seconds. Strain into a martini glass.

 

 

Apple Almond-Butter Bite Backs

Healthy-Halloween2 apples

With apple’s coming into their prime season, it’s no wonder there are two recipes that incorporate them into our list. These Apple Bite Backs look amazing and taste even better, plus they don’t actually bite.

Ingredients:

  • Apples
  • Almond Butter
  • Jam
  • Almond Slices

First slice the apple on either side of the core, leaving 2 halves with the core free standing. Cut the halves into half slices again. Then cut a triangle middle slice out of the skin side of the apple leaving an open mouth shape. Spread the almond butter (or jam) into the mouth of the apple. Stick almond slices in as teeth! (recipe from ohsheglows.com)

 

Vegetable Plater Ideas

 

 

vegetable-platter-ideas-halloween-1

 

 

 

vegetable-platter-ideas-halloween-2

 

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AYURVEDA and Fall 

 

staying-grounded

 

On week 57 let’s take a look at what the ancient system of Ayurveda is about and what modalities are available to us to enter fall in an aware synergy with this season so we can live in harmony and wellness with mother earth and attune our bodies to be in harmony with it. When we live conscious of mind, body, and spirit we are whole and we can function from well-sustained energy that supports us in every aspect of our lives.

You may think, what this has to do with beauty? well is very simple a well-balanced health and a calm nervous system, assist to beauty from the inside out in all levels, when we feel good we radiate an inner glow through our eyes and smile and that is really beautiful.

Let’s take a tour of our body and what goes on in fall, so with this information, we can be aware of how we work with the earth’s rhythms in the different seasons and where we can improve and what is better for us to refrain from, keeping in mind that takes persistence and dedication from our part it just doesn’t  happen overnight be gentle with your self, stressing over it, is not what the goal is, that will only add tearing down health, just take your time and have fun.

Share with family and friends so they can also benefit from it, and thank you from all of us we appreciate the loyalty and love that you send to us.

Our Muscles & Colon

 

 

This video can truly explain why we have pains, dryness and so much more and how easy is to correct it

Fall as you may know already is the opposite of spring season, by late September as our reduced blood flow leaves our muscles it induces fatigue. In fall the days start to grow darker earlier, so a comfortable evening curled up on the couch or our beds with a favorite movie or a book seem to be the thing to do hmmm I love the idea and for me that includes my sweet puppies. Our smooth muscle tissue and that includes the tissue of our colon, it starts to become sluggish when the temperature and pulse rate drop. TIs a fact that the colon, is also sensitive to stress, and holds the wear and tear of the autumn season.

 

Indigestion & Electrolytes

It is a process called cold diuresis, the name Diuresis refers to the physiological process by which urine production in the kidneys is increased as part of the body’s homeostatic way to maintain our fluid balance. This action causes fluid loss in Autumn. Cold diuresis is a response to vasoconstriction from our bodies. As our blood vessels constrict, it increases blood pressure is kind like squeezing the air inside a balloon. Our kidneys then proceed to release the extra pressure by removing fluids from circulation and emptying them into the urine and that is their job to balance the system. A summer of hot sweating followed by cold diuresis may leave you dehydrated and electrolyte deficient this is good to keep in mind. So it is important to keep in mind to add foods that can support electrolyte, juicy and salty taste encourages water retention for dry Vata. Vata types should avoid dry foods in the fall altogether so their system can function optimally.

 

Cold Feet & Warm Socks

 

feet-in-winter-socks-before-fireplace

Some people get cold feet even when wearing extra warm socks to warm their feet. Too much of tight clothing like socks can’t coax blood out of hibernation once it moves to the core. The body at this point may simply lack the strength to maintain core temperature and warm our feet. A sweater to heat the core does a better job than an extra pair of socks to cure cold feet, especially tight ones. Lifestyle changes, such as warm clothes and indoor heating, can convince the body it has heat to spare. Additionally, daily oil massage in the morning before bath coats the skin and prevents evaporation. As in summer sweat, evaporation causes significant heat loss. Oil massage thus helps retain heat by creating a protective barrier, let’s be aware of the kinds of oil that can help with this process. Once the pathological cold has penetrated our system, hot baths may be the only way to restore circulation. A pinch of turmeric keeps circulation strong. Sour lemons in morning tea convince sweat glands and stomach glands to stay juicy, Ginger lemon tea is a great aid here.
Fall is a time of transition. It is evident everywhere around us. Trees and shrubs are quietly undressing in preparation for the winter in their beautiful rhythm of the seasons. There is a subtle browning of the earth she goes within. Temperatures, which, just a few weeks ago were raging with the intense heat of summer, are beginning to hint at the telltale crispness of autumn. And there is the wind: slowly gathering strength, carrying the tides of winter on its breath to its role in nature. Fall harbors a certain emptiness that can leave us feeling exposed and a little raw, but it is also filled with possibility—a time when we, too, can strip down to a quiet essence of being and savor the simplicity of life and heart connection. The fall brings with it a predominance of air element and prana (the vital breath, the subtle essence of life) is abundant in the atmosphere at this time. Autumn is dry, it can be rough, windy, erratic, cool, subtle, and clear. These are all qualities shared by Vata dosha, and because like increases like, autumn is considered a Vata season. This same principle illustrates why taking a few simple steps to balance Vata dosha this fall can be tremendously beneficial to be in balance

 

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Emotions, the Mind, Inspiration time

life-should-be-a-continuous-source-of-inspiration-quotes-yogananda

The fall is a time for inspiration and to work on new ideas. The movement of blood from the extremities back to the core increases blood flow to the mind a very interesting process of the intelligence of our body. The opportunity to reflect on the last few months could stir up emotions as well. The Wind, sudden temperature shifts, and the school season also provoke higher stress levels this time of year. According to Ayurveda, keeping the nervous system stable through fall is our number one tool for maintaining strong immunity and staying healthy. Ashwagandha is Ayurveda’s most important herb for Vata-type anxiety and Chywanprash helps build immunity.

 

Routine & Flexibility

 

 

 

When we wear oneself ragged in the Fall social calendar it can result in a compromised immunity for flu season. Alternatively, relaxation and downtime free up the energy to help the body prepare for winter. Skipping meals, staying up late, and irregular mealtimes, toxic process food that had never seen sun or soil, create stress and deficiency. Here is a great contributor to check, Joyful Belly offers a nurturing fall program called Restoring Youth and Vitality to prepare the body for winter.
Ayurveda is an ancient science based on elemental principles that pertain to life on earth and the connection to it with body, mind, and soul is no separation here. Ayurveda recognizes the elements of ether, air, fire, water, and earth as the building blocks of the natural world. According to Ayurveda, these five elements pair-up in three combinations to form the primary forces of nature called doshas. Ether and air from Vata dosha.  Fire and water make up pitta dosha.  Water and earth create Kapha dosha which we all possess in ourselves.

 Fall Is a Great Time for an Ayurvedic Detox

 

 

Each one of us has a unique mix of the three doshas, although we tend to be dominated by one at any given time. Ane the seasons are also governed by its own doshic activity.  The ayurvedic theory says, that by the time autumn comes around, we have accumulated plenty of heat in our tissues from the summer heat—fiery pitta dosha. When the leaves dry up and the weather starts to change, Vata dosha begins to take over and the one governed by air and marked by change, instability, and anxiety when not balanced. If we would speak metaphorically, what happens when you add random blasts of air to a fire? It burns even brighter right?. So Ayurveda system says that when the accumulated heat of pitta is fanned by vata, it can lead to mental and physical burnout and we definitely don’t want that, it stresses our adrenals and nervous system and putting some of the body’s natural detoxification processes on hold.

Let’s talk about the liver, for example. It is the body’s natural detoxifier and one of the primary organs in which excess pitta can accumulate and cause serious problems. The liver processes not only the foods and drinks we ingest but also many of the harsh chemicals we encounter on a daily basis—flike prescription and over-the-counter medications, over-processed foods to cosmetics loaded with petroleum ingredients and synthetic perfumes to polluted matter in the air. And then the liver gets overloaded with excess pitta (these put tremendous stress on the liver), and that has a large effect on our overall wellness.  The overtaxed liver can result in migraines, irritability, rashes, anger, and skin issues and so much more. “It will make us tired, we get sick easily, we will gain or lose too a lot of weight. These two systems in the body are designed to “transform” toxins when the liver and the digestive tract become overwhelmed, we collect a kind of toxic sludge made up of all the waste products that the body has not been able to properly break down, digest or otherwise expel, creating much toxicity.

 

In Ayurveda, the toxins our body cannot process have a name: Ama, the meaning in Sanskrit is “that which harms or weakens” no so good. Ama is not only a kind of physical sludge but also as a psychosomatic sludge that pollutes the mind. Accumulated ama is the basis for many diseases and emotional disturbances—and from a physical standpoint, it creates an appealing host environment all the illnesses that blow in on autumn’s winds.

 

 

Do You Really Need to Detox

 

 

We don’t think that we have to worry about ama, well not so fast. We all do,  as a result of poor diet choices, unhealthy lifestyle habits, stress in general, lack of hydration—even just living and breathing in a polluted world with pesticide additives to most products. No matter who you are, you’ll end up with ama, and is a reality for us humans and even animals. Now the question we have to ask ourselves is, ‘What can we do about it?'”

 

 

Ayurvedic Detox

 

 

To protect your health year-round, but particularly during the fall, Ayurvedic health educators say it’s important to slow down, support your liver’s natural ability to remove toxins from the body, and take stock of the influences that you allow into your life—from the kind of food you eat to the amount of time you spend in front of an electronic device (computer, cell phone, TV).

Unlike some popular cleanses that ask you to undergo dramatic fasts or to take other extreme measures, Purva karma (which literally means “up-front actions”) is designed to support, instead of shock, your system. “Rather than aiming to eliminate toxins at any cost, Purva karma gently balances the whole person so that they can detox without destabilizing the body in any way,” Blossom explains. “It is a middle-path cleanse that uses nourishing foods, herbs, and self-care techniques to rejuvenate the body rather than simply strip it down, which can leave you even more vulnerable going into winter.”

Blossom says that a middle-path method of cleansing includes a simplified diet, yoga asana, self-massage, nasal irrigation, herbs, meditation, pranayama, and reflection. During the cleanse, you’ll forgo substances and habits that contribute to liver overload—such as processed foods or alcohol—and the unaddressed stress that strains your nervous system. You’ll also spend time thinking about what influences you want to keep in your life and what you might want to let go of. The main key to Purva karma is a suspension of bad habits. Then and only then can we have space to establish the good habits we need to create the kind of health and vibrancy that we all want in our  life.”

 

 

 Start Slowing Down

 

Taking action and start reducing stress and mental overactivity is perhaps the most important element of a successful step in any detox plan. Constant rushing, over multitasking, and information overloads are the trifecta of North American toxicity. And like an overtaxed liver, an overtaxed mind and nervous system can lead to a host of health issues, including adrenal fatigue, insomnia, irregular menstrual cycles, indigestion, and unwelcome weight gain.

The first step in reducing the toxicity created by an overloaded life? Slowing down. During the next seven days, adjust your schedule so you have time to prepare and eat your meals in a relaxed manner, practice daily yoga, and take regular meditation breaks. By saying “no” to the outside influences that pull your attention and energy in so many directions—and replacing them with healthier choices—you’ll begin to tune in to your body’s natural rhythms and detox more effectively.

 

 

The Detox Diet

 

Next, you need to nourish your body with healthful, cleansing foods. At the heart of the dietary program is kitchari, a simple dish of rice and mung beans widely used throughout Asia to purify the body. Its balance of protein, carbohydrates, and fat makes for an easy-to-digest yet highly nourishing meal. Kitchari is also tridoshic, which means that it’s appropriate for all three doshas. “The lightness of the dish reduces Kapha in the body,” Blossom says. “At the same time, it stabilizes vata by offering a complete source of protein. And the astringent nature of the beans cools pitta, so kitchari is naturally anti-inflammatory.” Best of all, eating kitchari twice daily keeps hunger and cravings at bay, he says.

Ayurvedic cleansing also calls for ghee (clarified butter), which lubricates the digestive tract and facilitates the elimination of toxins from the body. Spicy teas and chutneys are recommended to keep the fires of digestion stoked throughout the cleanse; and Triphala, a traditional Ayurvedic digestive tonic (made up of three fruits—amalaki, bibhitaki, and haritaki) with antioxidant properties, acts as a mild laxative. “Triphala is a classic example of an Ayurvedic remedy that supports the system and preserves what is good while it gets rid of toxins that will sicken the body,” Blossom explains. “Taken together, all parts of this plan make sure you’re getting everything you need to stay healthy and you won’t be malnourished in any way.”

 

 

 Cleansing Yoga

 

Specific yoga poses can help expedite the detoxification process. The heating and twisting sequences designed for this plan can help move toxins from your tissues through your lymphatic and digestive systems so that they can be eliminated from the body. In addition, restorative poses, relax the nervous system and mind and help settle the body—which is especially important during and after a detox cleanse. Restorative poses will also help bring you into a state of receptivity that’s perfect for the season, says New Jersey yoga teacher and restorative teacher trainer Jillian Pransky. “I look at autumn as a transition into a new year,” she says. “I look at nature: The harvest is over, and it’s time to clear out. It’s an opportunity to till the soil and plant the seeds for next year’s harvest. Once we do this for ourselves, we can recommit to what is working for us and set ourselves up to get more of what nourishes us in our lives.”

 

 

 Self-contemplation

 

As you embark on the program, contemplate the ultimate reason: “Why am I doing this?” By interrupting your normal patterns, cleansing provides a unique opportunity to practice svadhyaya, self-study. No matter what your motivation is—better health, a simpler life, a deeper yoga practice—you’ll be amazed at the insights you can gain when you just slow down and start to listen.”The body should be telling us all the time what to do and what not to do—it knows what’s good for it and what is not,” Svoboda says.  Getting out of our own way is finely the key.” And that is the point, for the most part. It is ideal that at the end of the cleanse, it is recommended to take a day to meditate, be quiet and observe, you may want to ask yourself: ‘What can I do from now on to make my life the best it can be? What are the habits that I am doing to sabotage myself? and how can I help that? just becoming aware is a huge step.

During a detox, it is encouraged taking time to contemplate not only what you want for your own life but also what you want to put out into the world and all around you. If you can, spend at a half or a full day in silence, and spend time in nature or journaling about your experience. Did the cleanse give you clarity about how you may be exerting energy in ways that don’t serve you, and where you can use that energy more effectively, perhaps even to help a larger cause?

Get clear on the answers, and your life will get simpler: Do what works; don’t do what does not work,  it hurts you on many levels. As we temporarily change our daily routines, we open ourselves up to seeing and feeling from whole new perspectives and we grow in evolution.

 

 

 

 

Ayurvedic Fall Cleanse Recipe: Harvest Stew

 

 

This stew is easy to digest and is made with seasonal vegetables.

 

Ingredients

2 tbsp olive oil
1 small onion, medium-finely diced
1–2 tsp of high-quality sea salt
1 large carrot, finely chopped
2 small parsnips, finely chopped
2 cups butternut squash, diced to taste
2 cups green cabbage, diced
2 tsp fresh rosemary leaves
2 tsp fresh thyme leaves
4 cups vegetable stock

 

Preparation

In a large soup pot place, the olive oil on heat at medium-high, then sauté the onions until transparent. When onions start to get clear, add a pinch of salt and the carrot. Add parsnips until they feel soft, repeat with squash and then cabbage last.

Taste it and add salt to your like and continue to sauté vegetables until they begin to slightly stick to the bottom of the pan.

Add the rosemary and thyme, stir, and deglaze by adding a little vegetable stock  Add the rest of the stock. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover, and simmer on low for about half-hour. Taste occasionally and add, rosemary, or thyme until the desired flavor is achieved.

And there it is a delicious dish.

 

Part 2 of Ayurveda and Fall it will come soon

 


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